Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications


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How can I help a particular child who does not seem to be learning? Are there some more effective ways to handle transition times? During Stage I, the neophyte acquires a baseline of information about what young children of a given age are like and what to expect of them.

By Stage II, the teacher is beginning to identify individual children whose behavior departs from the pattern of most of the children she knows. Thus she identifies the more unusual or exceptional patterns of behavior that have to be addressed to ensure the steady progress of the whole class. During this stage, on-site training continues to be valuable.

Young Children's Oral Language Development

A trainer can help the teacher by engaging in joint exploration of an individual problem case. Take, for example, the case of a young preschool teacher eager to get help who expressed her problem in the question "How should I deal with a clinging child?

However, without firsthand knowledge of the child and the context, an extended give-and-take conversation between teacher and trainer or mentor may be the best way to help the teacher interpret her experience and move toward a solution of the problems in question. The trainer might ask the teacher such questions as "What strategies have you tried so far? Can you give an example of some experiences with this particular child during this week?

When you did such and such, how did the child respond? In addition, during this stage, the need for information about specific children or problems that young children present suggests that learning to use a wider range of resources would be timely. Psychologists, social and health workers, and other specialists can strengthen the teacher's skills and knowledge at this time. Exchanges of information and ideas with more experienced colleagues may help a teacher master the developmental tasks of this stage.

Opportunities to share feelings with other teachers in the same stage of development may help to reduce some of the teacher's sense of personal inadequacy and frustration.

Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation.

Often during the third or fourth year of teaching, the teacher begins to tire of doing the same things, offering the same activities, and celebrating the same sequence of holidays. She may begin to ask more questions about new developments in the field: "What are some new approaches to helping children's language development? Who is doing what? What are some of the new materials, techniques, approaches, and ideas being developed these days?

Education Development Center (EDC)

If it is true that a teacher's own interest and commitment to the projects and activities she provides for children contribute to their educational value, then her need for renewal and refreshment should be taken seriously. During this stage, teachers are likely to find it especially rewarding to meet colleagues from different programs on both formal and informal occasions.

Teachers in this developmental stage are particularly receptive to experiences in local, regional, and national conferences and workshops, and they profit from membership in professional associations and participation in their meetings. Teachers are now widening the scope of their reading, scanning numerous magazines and journals, viewing films and videotapes, and using the Internet as a source of fresh ideas. Perhaps during this period, they may be ready to take a close look at their own classroom teaching through videotaping themselves at work and reviewing the tapes alone or with colleagues.

This is also a time when teachers welcome opportunities to visit other classes, programs, and demonstration projects. Concerns about how best to assess young children's learning, and how to report and document it, are also likely to blossom during this period. Perhaps it is at this stage that teacher centers had the greatest potential value Silberman, ; Bailey, Teacher centers were once places where teachers gathered together to help each other learn or re-learn skills, techniques, and methods; to exchange ideas; and to organize special workshops.

From time to time, specialists in curriculum, child growth, or any other area of concern identified by the teachers were invited to the center to meet with them and focus on their concerns. Maturity may be reached by some teachers within three years, by others in five or more. The teacher at this stage is likely to have come to terms with herself as a teacher and to have reached a comfortable level of confidence in her own competence.

She now has enough perspective to begin to ask deeper and more abstract questions, such as "What are my historical and philosophical roots? What is the nature of growth and learning? How are educational decisions made? Can schools change societies? Is early childhood teaching really a profession? But with experience, the questions represent a more meaningful search for insight, perspective, and realism. Throughout maturity, teachers benefit from opportunities to participate in conferences and seminars and perhaps to work toward an advanced degree. Mature teachers welcome the chance to read widely and to interact with educators working on many problem areas on many different levels.

Similarly, introspective, in-depth discussions enjoyed by Stage-IV teachers may lead to restlessness and irritability among the beginning teachers in Stage I. Seminars, institutes, courses, degree programs, books, journals, conferences.

Educational psychology - Wikipedia

Conferences, professional associations, journals, magazines, films, visits to demonstration projects. On-site assistance, access to specialists, colleague advice, consultants. On-site support and technical assistance. In the above outline, four dimensions of training for teaching have been suggested: 1 developmental stages of the teacher, 2 training needs of each stage, 3 location of the training, and 4 timing of training:. Developmental Stage of the Teacher.

It is useful to think of the growth of teachers as occurring in stages, linked very generally to experience gained over time. Training Needs of Each Stage. The training needs of teachers change as experience accrues. For example, the issues dealt with in the traditional social foundations courses do not seem to address themselves to the early survival problems that are critical to the inexperienced. However, for the maturing teacher, attention to those same issues may help to deepen her understanding of the larger context in which she is trying to be effective.

Location of Training. Fair and inclusive education is desirable for a number of reasons. Everyone has a human right to develop their capacities and to participate fully in society.

Education and the skills and knowledge it provides also strongly influence one's life chances, employment opportunities and wages, and health, as well as one's future contribution to society and the economy. Furthermore, education plays an important role for general patterns of social and income inequality and mobility. For all these reasons, improving equity in education is a high priority in all OECD countries. Indeed, investing in equity pays off and equity in education goes hand in hand with quality and efficiency. Navigate the policy network to explore the world of education or use the search box to go directly to a thematic page of your choice.

Use the filtering box to display only thematic pages and related content for the level of education that you are interested in. All thematic pages give you a quick overview of the OECD's research and analysis. For more details, just click on individual key insights and policy options that you find interesting to get the bigger picture.

Print the thematic pages that you are interested in through the print function of your browser. The development of education policies always needs to take into account country-specific traditions and features of respective education systems. Not all policy options are equally relevant for different countries, different contexts give rise to different priorities. In some countries, policy suggestions may already be in place; in others, they may have less relevance owing to specific social, economic and educational structures and traditions.


  1. Action Step.
  2. Chapter 2: The nature of knowledge and the implications for teaching?
  3. Hoe Lees Je De Bijbel (Dutch Edition).

Policy options rather distil potentially useful ideas and lessons from the experiences of countries that have been searching for ways to improve their education system. As policy options are removed from their wider analytical context, it is strongly advised that readers should refer back to the original OECD source for the fuller picture.

Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications
Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications
Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications
Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications
Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications
Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications
Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications
Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: Sources of Learning and Classroom Implications

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